Schwinn – World’s Finest Bicycles

Schwinn - World's Finest Bicycles

Out of Stock  

$29.95 incl. GST

About Schwinn Bicycle Company

Ignaz Schwinn was born in Hardheim, Baden, Germany in 1860 and worked on two-wheeled ancestors of the modern bicycle that appeared in 19th century Europe. Schwinn emigrated to the United States in 1891.

In 1895, with the financial backing of fellow German American Adolph Frederick William Arnold (a meat packer), he founded Arnold, Schwinn & Company. Schwinn’s new company coincided with a sudden bicycle craze in America. Chicago became the center of the American bicycle industry. The bicycle boom was short-lived, as automobiles and motorcycles quickly replaced bikes on American streets.

Realizing he needed to grow the company, Ignaz Schwinn purchased several smaller bicycle firms, building a modern factory on Chicago’s west side to mass-produce bicycles at lower cost. In an atmosphere of general decline elsewhere in the industry, Schwinn’s new motorcycle division thrived, and by 1928 was in third place behind Indian and Harley-Davidson.

At the close of the 1920s, the stock market crash decimated the American motorcycle industry. Arnold, Schwinn, & Co. was on the verge of bankruptcy.

After traveling to Europe to get ideas, F.W. Schwinn returned to Chicago and in 1933 introduced the Schwinn B-10E Motorbike, actually a youth’s bicycle designed to imitate a motorcycle. The company revised the model the next year and renamed it the Aerocycle. The bicycle would eventually come to be known as a paperboy bike or cruiser, and soon became an industry standard as other makers rushed to produce imitations.

In 1938, Frank W. Schwinn officially introduced the Paramount series. Developed from experiences gained in racing, Schwinn established Paramount as their answer to high-end, professional competitive bicycles. The Paramount used high-strength steel chromoly alloy tubing and expensive brass lug-brazed construction.

On 17 May 1941, Alfred Letourneur was able to beat the motor-paced world speed record on a bicycle, reaching 175 km/h (109 mph) on a Schwinn bicycle riding behind a car on the Los Angeles freeway.
Source: Wikipedia

Sizing

We’ve provided the following chart with size specifications for this particular metal sign. This might also be useful in helping you plan where you’d like to hang your metal sign:

Sizing Chart

Visualisations

These metal signs look great anywhere in the house, as well as your office, garage or shed. They’re even safe to hang above areas where food is prepared. For some inspiration, here’s a few examples of this metal sign:

Please note that the above are representations and you should use the sizing chart for accurate dimensions. See our FAQ to find out more about our metal signs.

Comments are closed.